Ginger | VitaMedica
Ginger Root

Ginger

(Zingiber officinale)

 

Ginger has been around for thousands of years and is associated with Indian and Chinese cooking. Although technically not a root but a rhizome (horizontal plant stem), ginger is available raw, powdered, pickled and crystallized. For ginger lovers, check out The Ginger People, a company devoted in making all natural ginger products and ingredients. Their Ginger Chews are spicy and hot!

 

Health Benefits

Ginger has traditionally been used as a digestive aid to relieve symptoms from an upset stomach, motion sickness and morning sickness.

 

The active constituents in ginger including gingerols not only give this spice its unique flavor but inhibit the formation of anti-inflammatory compounds. Many arthritis and chronic pain sufferers who regularly consume ginger obtain pain relief by regular consumption of ginger.

 

Nutritional Value

Ground ginger is more concentrated in nutrients than the fresh root. According to NutritionData, ground ginger has very strong anti-inflammatory properties (1447 IF rating for 1 tablespoon vs. 493 for 3 oz. of Atlantic salmon), so incorporating ginger into your meals is part of an anti-inflammatory diet. At 1.4 mg or 70% of daily values per tablespoon, ground ginger is an excellent source of manganese.

 

Recipe Ideas

When making a stir-fry, add fresh diced or grated ginger. Grill tuna or salmon and serve over a bed of lettuce and garnish with pickled ginger. Ginger is superb with chicken and fruits. Try our Curry Chicken Salad which features chicken, green apples, red grapes, dried currants and cranberries. The salad gets it kick from dollop of mayonnaise spiked with powdered ginger, curry and a dash of red pepper. For more recipe ideas, visit The Ginger People’s website.

 

Interesting Facts

Ginger can hinder blood clotting so if you’re having surgery, be sure to eliminate ginger containing supplements at least 2 weeks prior to your procedure.

 

In English pubs and taverns in the nineteenth century, barkeepers put out small containers of ground ginger, for people to sprinkle into their beer — the origin of ginger ale.